Nameless by Dean Koontz | Review

The Nameless series by Dean Koontz follows a character without a name. He, Nameless, has no memory of his life before two years ago. But, the twist is he doesn’t care that he has amnesia. He believes his amnesia to be of his own choice. Instead, he spends his time righting wrongs. He helps those that the criminal system, for whatever reason, failed them. He is not completely alone in the endeavor; a team called Ace of Diamonds supports him on his missions.

The series was differently different. Nameless doesn’t focus on figuring out who he is like characters normally do in amnesia stories. Nameless doesn’t question Ace of Diamonds like you normally see/read in these types of stories. From the beginning, he has accepted his life.

The series isn’t really a mystery series. The bad guys are known right away. Nameless doesn’t investigate; or if he does, it is very little. Before the book begins, the perpetrator is already declared guilty. Koontz leaves no question that the villain is quite evil.

The series isn’t really a thriller either. Ace of Diamonds seems to know pretty much everything. There aren’t too many incidents were Nameless is caught off guard. In fact, most of the time the perpetrator never even sees him. There isn’t some long gun battle between the two or a high-adrenaline kung-fu battle. The books almost read like a police report or some military after action report. You never fear for Nameless’ safety; Ace of Diamonds is nearly always in control.

The strange thing is that it kind of works. Maybe it’s because it is a fresh take on storytelling. Or maybe it’s that there are a few moments of suspense. It was odd. I enjoyed the first book; I didn’t find it boring or “too safe.” It wasn’t until the end that I realized how in control the protagonist was. It should have been boring. I should have been asking, “Where’s the conflict?” I guess this shows how masterful Koontz is in writing; he can make a mission report engaging.

I give the series a 4.9/5 because there is just something that nags at you. It isn’t perfect, but you can’t figure out what it is. The writing was excellent; and even though there seemed to be no conflict or rising action, I was not bored. I enjoyed this fresh idea. Maybe it comes down to personal taste. There were times that the descriptions were too vivid, like when the villains would feel themselves over.

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Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.

Number Dependent | Infinity Train

May contain spoilers for Book 2 of Infinity Train

One of the main staples of the Infinity Train show on Cartoon Network is the glowing number on the passenger’s hand. In the show, the number represents the person’s progression. The higher the number the further they are to leaving/solving their problem or shortcoming. As the passenger learns, the number goes down.

While watching the series, I thought that’d be nice if we had numbers in real life. Something to let us know that we are being stupid. Just like in the show, we could also identify creeps/bad people by how high their number is. But, then I realized we’d act similar to the characters in the show. When Jesse has to kick a toad to escape one train car, he keeps checking his number. When he is about to kick it, his number goes up. When he stops, it goes down.

I could see people depending too much on their number. They would do things not because they were the right thing but so they can lower their number. We’d also start consulting the number for every choice. “Should I wear my blue shorts today? Oh, my number went up, so I’ll wear something else.”

So it’s probably a good thing we just have our conscience to tell us when we’re being stupid. If it was something more physical or blunt, we’d pass the blame on to it. “I did it because my number went down.”

Until next wormhole…thanks for reading.


Who Pranked JR releases March 24. You can preorder it from many online retailers.

Apex Connection | Infinity Train (Spoilers)

Contains spoilers for Book 2 of Infinity Train.

While watching the last episodes of season 2/book 2 of Infinity Train, I got serious The Matrix vibes. That passenger farm (or tape car) seemed a lot like that place that hooks everyone into the virtual world. When they downloaded the passenger’s memories onto the tape, I started to wonder if The Apex were right. Maybe the passengers weren’t human; maybe they’re clones or robot duplicates. Once I was done shivering from that thought, I started pondering about The Apex.

You meet The Apex in the carnival car but their real story is in the episode “The Mall Car.” The Apex believe that lowering your number is a bad thing; they think that leaving the train is bad. This attitude only reinforced my idea that the train is really downloading people’s memories into machine duplicates. Grace even says to Simon, “We just lost a human, show some respect.”

But, what got me interested is that Grace kept saying, “I read it in a book.” She says she got the Apex name from a book. It made me wonder if some company called Apex created the train. If Apex made the train, it would make sense that The Apex would name themselves after it, since The Apex believe the train belongs to them. I wonder if the book was some kind of manual or journal left behind by the developers.

If my idea is correct then why would they build the train. I think it has something to do with the Wasteland. I went back to The Matrix connection. Maybe there was some kind of disaster and now the train takes people from the past. The train sets up these journeys so that people will become better and hopefully change the future. Maybe Apex created the train, set up the robots to run it, and then the humans died off. Now, there’s a train trying to get people to change their ways.

When MT steals a pod, One-One says that the tape car is the only car were the universe is on the outside of the car. It could mean that the tape car is the reality while the rest of the train is just an illusion. It kind of made me think that the train is just a place for AIs to learn to become human. We see MT, a native of the train, want to become human.

I think I just got another chill.

What did you think of Infinity Train, if you saw it? Do you have any theories? Let me know in the comments below.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.

What Did Finn Want to Say | Theory

May contain spoilers of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

During the Rise of Skywalker movie, Finn says that he needs to tell Rey something before they are about to die. They end up not dying and Rey asks what he wanted to say. He says that it isn’t important or he’ll tell her later. For the rest of the movie, Poe keeps asking Finn what he was going to say. Turns out, the audience doesn’t find out either–unless there was an end credit scene I missed.

At first, I thought it was just kind of a throw away joke; but when Poe kept asking, I started to think there was something more. The writers kept reminding the audience that Finn wanted to tell Rey something. It is likely that it was something important if they are giving up dialogue time for it. One extra time can be seen as a joke, but over and over becomes a sign.

My first reaction was that he wants to tell her he loves her. It seems natural; they met when the adventure began. Finn’s arrival is what began the whole trilogy. Normally, the male and female lead would end up together. But, Finn is in love with Rose.

The next possibility is that Finn is Rey’s brother/cousin. Finn was taken and raised to be a Stormtrooper. He could be related in some way. But seeing as we finally see Rey’s parents it is unlikely he is a blood sibling–but that doesn’t rule out adoption or a cousin. Personally, I hope they don’t do this. The surprise family relation thing has been done to death with Star Wars.

Another possibility, and the one I think is most likely, is that Finn wanted to tell her he is a Force user. In the first movie, it seems that Finn is the Jedi we are looking for. The music and cinematography for the battle between Finn and the First Order trooper when Finn activates the lightsaber seemed to suggest Finn is “the one.” Then throughout Rise of Skywalker, Finn pauses and does that staring-off-into-space thing that Force users do before they say something. Finn would look off into the distance and say that Rey was in danger. Sounds like something a Force user would say, doesn’t it. The ending with Rey’s lightsaber–specifically the symbolism of the color–would suggest that she is going to find other Force users and train/protect them; she could possibly be starting with Finn.

During the film, the Force Ghosts of the others Jedis say that Rey carries their history in her. The movie could be suggesting by this statement and her saber color that she will be a guardian, not a battlefield Jedi. Also, who her family is suggests that she will be a leader and not the “on the ground” hero in the next set of movies/series.

It seemed to me that they were hinting at Finn being the focus in the next saga.

What do you think? Could Finn be a Force user? Or is his secret something else? Let me know in the comments below.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


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Invincible Quill Magazine (Nov. issue) | Rapid Review

The following are my opinion and do not reflect the opinion of any organization or person. May contain spoilers!

Invincible Quill Magazine November 2019 issue (Earnest Writes, free download): The latest issue has launched, and it’s about National Novel Writing Month (aka NaNoWriMo). The latest issue focuses on helping writers through NaNoWriMo. There are poems, prompts, and articles. I did notice some typos and some awkward sentences, but what work of art doesn’t have flubs? I liked the “Writing Styles Alignments” chart that lets you know if you were a neutral pantser or a chaotic plotter. According to the sheet, I’m a chaotic plantser; this means that I have a plot idea and then it all goes crazy from there. I also enjoyed the article by Kairavi Pandya titled “Better Egotist Than Poseur.” The article talks about how readers and writers alike think of novelists and poets as the brain surgeons of the field while they think of screenwriters or drama writers as loyal physicians. I like how the author mentions that a novelist is not better than someone who writes short stories–we’re all writers. Finally, this issue seemed to fly by. I got to one point and was like, “Why won’t this scroll any more?” It was because I was at the end of the magazine. The magazine was so interesting to read that it felt like I just started. The flow of poems to articles and back again made the reading captivating. I felt like I was reading something entertaining, not a boring textbook.

Do you have any shows, books, movies, etc you’d like to see a review on? Tell me in the comments.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


Join in the adventure as Joe and company deal with everything from waking up in the morning to stopping an alien invasion in the Christmas themed eBook Gift of the Minion. Releases Dec. 3. Preorder for $0.99, regular price $2.99.

Yolocraft, Fortnite, and More | Rapid Reviews (Spoilers)

The following are my opinion and do not reflect the opinion of any organization or person. May contain spoilers!

Yolocraft Season 8 (Blitzwinger & Unlimited Magic, YouTube): With another death the eighth season of Yolocraft comes to a close. *sob* It was an interesting one with unexplained deaths and disappearing horses. It was also odd to actually know more about the new Minecraft features than they did; usually it was them telling me. But, as always, the team of Blitzwinger and Unlimited Magic provided video after video of entertainment. There was humor and there was suspense. Each time they went into the Nether was nerve wrecking. And there were episodes I wished they would have edited; for instance, watching them ride their horses for about 30 minutes while they looked for the Pillager Outpost. Probably the best part of the series was the thousands of chickens they had.

Fortnite Chapter 2 Season 1 (Epic Games, PlayStation 4, Xbox, and more): Before you get too excited, I know that season 1 isn’t over–I also know that apparently it’s been extended to February–this is just a little recap/mid-review. The first chapter of Fortnite I didn’t play much. It was mostly the crossover events. First, I couldn’t afford any skins. Second, I’m bad at shooter games. Third, I felt like I didn’t get anywhere. It seemed like I never leveled up or progressed and on top of that I couldn’t make it passed the nineties. So, I am enjoying the new leveling system where it tells you in big letters, “Hey! You leveled up!” I also like how you can see your progress in the Battle Pass section. I don’t know how much of the menus they fixed, but it seems easier to find things like missions. I really enjoy the extra XP time during the weekends. When I first saw how far I’d have to go to get any of the Battle Pass skins, I thought, “That’s never going to happen,” then one day I was at level 60. I don’t know if they reworked their matchups but I seemed to actually survive for longer periods and actually get eliminations. Before, it was just me running away and dying…a lot. I’m also looking forward to this villain team/EGO thing they are hinting at.

Photographing the Dead by Dean Koontz (Nameless series, #2): I have to agree with some of the reviews I’ve seen that the second book wasn’t as good as the first, but that doesn’t make it bad. I still found it to be thrilling and hard to put it down. I liked how Koontz kept shifting to the two women hiking. You knew that they were going to meet the killer at some point, but would they survive? I kind of felt like I was always racing towards some unavoidable fate. Koontz’s villain was creepy as always; he really knows how to make a truly evil antagonist. You feel no pity for the man. I enjoy how Koontz tells the reader that sometimes the person is just evil–that they do something just because they can or they think they are better than everyone else. In the first book, I didn’t feel that there was much danger for Nameless–I kind of felt the same in this one–but I was worried for the hikers. Now that I think about it, maybe that’s the point: feel for the victims. After Nameless sees those “ghosts” at the end, I began to wonder if Nameless isn’t so “nice.” Maybe he murdered someone and we shouldn’t feel sympathy or worry about him.

Do you have any shows, books, movies, etc you’d like to see a review on? Tell me in the comments.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


Join in the adventure as Joe and company deal with everything from waking up in the morning to stopping an alien invasion in the Christmas themed eBook Gift of the Minion. Releases Dec. 3. Preorder for $0.99, regular price $2.99.

Pokemon, Nameless, and Mandalorian | Rapid Reviews (Spoilers)

The following are my opinion and do not reflect the opinion of any organization or person. May contain spoilers!

Pokemon Sword/Shield (Game Freak, Nintendo Switch): From the little bit that I’ve seen of the games, through YouTubers like Stampy Cat and GhostRobo, it looks like the other versions of Pokemon. It seems to keep the same mechanic of battle and catch Pokemon. I do like that they added sneaking. It’s nice to see that there is a way to lower your wild Pokemon encounters than by using repel after repel. I haven’t seen a gym challenge yet, but I do like the idea; and from what I’ve gathered it sounds like the gyms have some kind of mission that you need to complete first. I also enjoyed that the player’s rival, Hop, seems to have more of a part than just “smell ya later.” He actually hangs out with the player for a little bit. They (the developers, players–I’m not sure where the tale began) said that the opening/tutorial was shorter, but it looked to be just as long too me. Finally, I have to say Yamper is cute. I think it might be my second favorite Pokemon; I still like Growlithe more–though they get bonus points for the “amp” Poke-pun.

In the Heart of the Fire by Dean Koontz (Nameless series): Pretty much everything you’d want from the first book in a series. You get introduced to the main character; you get a feel for the world; and you understand the character’s goals. The story has lots of suspense and action. The writing grabs you and you can imagine yourself in the world. Also since the character has no name, you can put yourself into the shoes of the character a little bit easier. I do have a problem with how OP Nameless is. He has this nearly all-powerful organization helping him. They can hack into anything, and they can plan for any problem. Nameless himself seems very capable. I didn’t feel worried that Nameless could be hurt. He can be injured, and he can be surprised; but it just seems like everything falls into place thanks to the planning of the organization. I’m glad the books are short; I can finish one in a short period of time and move on to something else. The shortness also adds to the sense of a deadline; it keeps the book moving forward. Finally, I liked that the whole series was released at once so I can “binge read” them. I think with the stories being so short, if Koontz released them one at time, I might have not been interested. FYI, you can get a discount on the entire collection on Amazon (not sponsored, not an affiliated link).

The Mandalorian (Chapter 3: The Sin, Disney+): I really enjoyed how well the production team showed more of the Mandalorian’s character, and the lives of the surviving Mandalorians, without telling. Within only a few seconds of a scene, you could tell who was the leader, what the Mandalorian culture is, and the personality of the main Mandalorian. The episode also did a great job with their battle scenes. Both the ranged/gunfight and the hand-to-hand stealth fight were done well; I enjoyed how they balanced it out–it wasn’t all fist fights or all blaster battles. The crew seems to be able to jump between the two well. I also enjoyed the hints at possible other plots or conflicts, such as one villain stating that the metal is easy to come by but not a crafter. I wondered if the villain knew that the Mandalorians were in hiding; I half expected the metal to be bugged. When young Mandalorian was about to be killed by a droid in his flashback, I hopped that Original Yoda would have shown up to rescue him, showing why he might care for the baby Yoda. Finally, I enjoyed how they make the Mandalorian tough but kind. He isn’t gruff and likable like Wolverine. You can tell Mandalorian had it rough and he’s been affected by it, but you can see his kindness and how he wants to protect his people. He wants to honor their culture, i.e. he is the culture and history of Mandalore–which is probably why he hasn’t been given a name yet.

Do you have any shows, books, movies, etc you’d like to see a review on? Tell me in the comments.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


Join in the adventure as Joe and company deal with everything from waking up in the morning to stopping an alien invasion in the Christmas themed eBook Gift of the Minion. Releases Dec. 3. Preorder for $0.99, regular price $2.99.