Inspiration #2

The following is a collection of story ideas that I don’t have time to do or have lost interest in. Feel free to use them for your stories, but please mention something akin to “based on an idea by Joe Rover, joerover.com.” Feel free to mix and modify the ideas.

After a strong storm overturned her vehicle, Samantha Prowler wakes to a world in the mist of massive climate change. Storms and heatwaves rack the planet. Now, she must battle the elements and a frightened nation as she tries to find shelter.

The animals of a nearby town have had it with the animal abuse, dog fights, and more. They begin to stage a war against mankind, but first they’ll have to learn how to open doors. Will they succeed? And what happens to a young child who stumbles upon a resistance meeting? Will they open doors for the animals or will they help the animals to realize there is a reason for being called “man’s best friend?”

Blog prompt: Trolls/negative comments. How do you deal with negative comments? What advice would you give someone who’s being bullied? Have you gotten any negative comments? How do you feel when you get one? What do you think makes someone be a cyberbully or an Internet troll?

A carnival fortuneteller tells a young teen that they’ll die from being hit by lightning while on a camping trip. The teen thinks, “Pfft, yeah right,” until the day of the school camping trip. Other strange things the fortuneteller said start coming true and a storm is brewing. How do they avoid their fate? Do they?

A famous singer (or actor) starts receiving death threats. What do they do when it turns out the threats are coming from their bodyguard?

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


Inspiration #1

The following is a collection of story ideas that I don’t have time to do or have lost interest in. Feel free to use them for your stories, but please mention something akin to “based on an idea by Joe Rover, joerover.com.” Feel free to mix and modify the ideas.

A pair of teenage sleuths get in over their heads as they discover members of their local police force are corrupt. The rouge officers have their hands in many illegal activities within the town–everything from drugs to rape to murder.

An animal activist and an intelligent talking animal must team up to save a community of intelligent animals from poachers. The activist at first things being around talking, thinking animals is great but the idea of being around animals that never stop talking wears thin over time. Also, the animals appear to have lost their innocence and are acting more like humans. Will the activist still support the animals or will they start to see the animals as having the same flaws as mankind?

What started as a friendly hot air balloon race turns nasty as the prize money and fame increase. Friends turn on friends and rivals get rougher as storms, malfunctions, and other contestants try to put a stop to the race. The teams will stop at nothing to win, even creating the weirdest and silliest offense and defense gadgets/weapons ever thought of for hot air balloons. Everything from giant needles to catapults that launch cats–nothing is left unused, even the kitchen sink.

Bobby, a young intern for the big city newspaper, is hungry for the story that’ll finally show everyone his worth. Instead he is trapped covering the obituaries. It’s a thankless job filled with upset (and sometimes outright furious) family members and a tedious, repetitive form he must follow. But while on the surface they seem unrelated, Bobby soon sees something amiss. As he begins to investigate, he uncovers a conspiracy that could get him the recognition he wants–if he lives. Is it a government experiment? Ancient plots? Mad scientists? Maybe all of the above.

After the death of a loved one in a car crash, a physicist creates a time machine. They succeed in stopping the crash only to have their loved one killed in a case of road rage. Another attempt stops the road rage, but their loved one dies in a hit and run. However, this time the physicist recognizes the driver–it is the same from the crash and the road rage. Slowly, the physicist discovers the accident was no accident but murder. Why is someone after their loved one?

Aliens have had it with human hate crimes. They’ve chosen four people (you select the combination of race, gender, disability, etc) to prove humanity can change by having them work together to stop a series of hate crimes. If the four are unable to stop the crimes, the aliens will “eliminate the problem” themselves. Can the four work together or is the human race doomed?

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading!


Alone (eBook only) is on sale for $0.99 until Sept. 3, 2019. Buy now and join in the urban fantasy adventure.

FNAF Doomed? | Tips and Tricks

Recently, I watched the “FNAF IS DOOMED! The Real Truth of Five Nights at Freddy’s” video by Treesicle. I think they might have a point.

If you talk to others within the FNAF or YouTube Gaming “bubble” (as Treesicle called it), they would tell you Five Nights at Freddy’s is an important and game-changing game. But if you talk to people outside that bubble, they tend to look at you weird. “What is FNAF?” they say, “Is that some kind of new disease?”

If you mention Sonic the Hedgehog or Mario, most people would understand who you’re talking about. They probably wouldn’t have a great amount of details about them, but they would at least know they were video game characters.

And the Treesicle crew is right about the YouTube bubble. I’m always hearing about hundreds or thousands of people who buy the merch of people like TheOdd1sOut or It’s Alex Clark, but I never see anyone wearing the merch IRL. About the only time I see anything about YouTube Creators outside of YouTube itself is if they wrote a book.

The video continues to mention why some franchises stay around for decades while others don’t. The video starts out with character development and world building. I have to agree there isn’t much world building to FNAF. If asked by someone what FNAF is, I’d say, “You play as a security guard who’s trying to survive not being killed by pizzeria animatronics.” There isn’t much to say about who the characters are, what they want, the world at large, or anything else.

The Treesicle people continue to talk about FNAF being a mystery. They mention how people love a mystery; but eventually, they want it solved. It’s fun trying to solve a mystery yourself. (Why do you think game theory, or just theory in general, YouTube channels are so popular?) The problem is after a while the audience would like to know if they are right. FNAF has been going on since 2014 with little to no information about “the truth.” By now, people want to know why the animatronics are after security guards, how did they come to life, and so on. There’s a lot of theories on YouTube but not a lot of answers.

Next, they talk about the fact FNAF is a horror game. They show statistics that horror is not that popular of a genre. It makes sense. The first time you see a horror movie or experience a horror game, you’re nervous and jumpy. The first time that ax murderer jumps out from behind the rosebush, you scream, jump, and gasp. The second time, you might jump a little because you forgot about the scare; but by the tenth time, you aren’t reacting at all. It’s hard to be spooked when you know exactly when the surprise is coming.

Another nail in the FNAF coffin is the game’s randomness. There doesn’t seem to be any skill involved. In the Mario games, you can gain platforming skills. You can learn timing on jumps; you can learn strategy (like choosing to toss that turtle shell at the right moment in order to cause a chain reaction). But, in FNAF a lot of it comes down to luck. Is Freddy going to come for you? Is Freddy even going to move that night?

For example, in a Mario level there might be a red warp pipe that takes you to a coin room. If you replay the level, the red warp pipe will still take you to the coin room. You could play the level 80 times and the red warp pipe will take you to the coin room. If it was a random game, one time the red warp pipe takes you to the coin room, but the next time the warp pipe doesn’t work; the next time, it might take you to a lava room.

Finally, the Treesicle team talks about the games and shows that do stick around. Most of them are adventure based. Again, this makes sense. Look at Captain America. What is his goal? Battle evil. There is always going to be some new evil to fight. What is the goal of Ash in Pokémon? Catch ’em all, to become the very best like no one ever was, and make friends. Can he ever do it? Can he really “catch them all”? Can he ever be “the best”? And you can always make new friends. The goals of the franchises that stick around are general enough that the characters never reach their goal, but specific enough that the audience feels like the character is making headway. Captain America will never defeat evil, but he can defeat the Red Skull. Now, look at FNAF. What is the goal? Survive five nights. You did that…now what? It makes for a great standalone game but not a series.

So, my word of advice to any game maker or author or screenwriter is if you want to make a series with staying power, you need a developed world with characters who’s goals are just vague enough that the character will never accomplish them but defined enough that it seems like they are accomplishing them. If you do have a mystery series, you need to solve the mystery relatively quickly (probably within a couple episodes/issues at most) then move on to the next mystery. Look at the mystery book classics, the mystery was solved by the end of the novel. Look at mystery TV shows, the case is usually solved by the end of the episode; they don’t leave it unsolved for five years.


Joe Rover eBooks are available at many online retailers, such as Barnes and Noble, Apple Books, Walmart eBooks, and more.

The first interactive story game based on my book series can be found here.