Insert Interesting Title Here

Pbbbt, I was going to talk about ItsAlexClark’s latest video about COPPA. He talks about how all he wants to do is entertain people but keeps getting roadblocks thanks to YouTube changing gears all the time.

I wanted to share it because I can relate. I just want to entertain too. I work for hours preparing and editing a video only to have zero views because of the algorithm, and now because of COPPA, I get no comments, no ads, and no listing in searches. Sure, I can take a chance and have the videos listed as “not for kids;” my target audience is teens and older because the stories deal with things like bullying, prejudice, and more. But, I said they were PG, not PG-13.

Anyway, I was also going to share how in the ItsAlexClark video, he talks about how Audible is doing a challenge. If you are a Amazon Audible member and you listen to three audiobooks before Mar. 3, you get a $20 Amazon gift card. I was then going to say something about using Clark’s sponsor/affiliate link in the description so that he can further receive support. If Amazon sees that (for the sake of argument) 300 used the link, they are more inclined to continue sponsoring him, which means more money so he can entertain the masses.

But…what’s the point. I get like zero views on YouTube videos. I’m lucky if I get a like on my blog posts. What’s the point of taking the time to research, craft, and edit these posts if no one sees them?

Recently, I’ve announced on social media about my next book coming out Mar. 24 and how if people are interested in doing a review, they can get the book early for free. It’s been about a week and…nothing. I didn’t expect a massive flood, but I thought there’d at least be one person interested in reading my book before everyone else.

I also considered sharing a GoFundMe link for a family member of mine because 2019 was rough (so was 2018). It really didn’t help any that I needed to have a root canal at the beginning of the year. Of course, it was the one tooth my insurance didn’t cover. I went to my church for help–one that my family has been playing into for generations upon generations (most of the time like hundreds of dollars a month per individual). After some feet dragging, complaining, and a message from my doctor threatening to send the bill to a collection agency, I got the help. This, of course, made me want to share SystemZee’s latest livestream because he talked about needing a root canal; he mentions how people can help support his channel so he can afford the procedure. It isn’t the root canal that’s painful; it’s the bill.

*I was going to link the actual video, but he doesn’t always archive his livestreams for some reason. Instead try his fiancée’s livestream on Mixer if you want (choose the Fighting the Dragon w/Patreons video)*

The feet dragging during the root canal was no big surprise. When I was a Boy Scout, we had camping trips. During the planning stage, the scouts would argue over which car I went in, not because they wanted me in the car, but because the thought of me being in the same building as them seemed to turn their stomachs. When it came time to talk about tent assignments, they had the person who didn’t show up for the meeting bunk with me. “That’ll teach him to miss a meeting,” the scouts would say.

If there was no one who missed the meeting, I got to sleep by myself. I usually got the area 20 yards away. One trip, even though my area was off from the others, somehow my sleeping bag got burn marks–the kind you see from purposeful burning.

School wasn’t much better. I got tripped, bottles thrown at me, hit with blocks of wood or thick cable wire or books. They would fart in my face. If I sat down on a bench, everyone would jump up with a scream and “fall down” as if my weight caused them to be catapulted into the air. And, of course, dodgeball was a joy. It wasn’t because everyone targeted me; no, it was because no one would target me. I could stand perfectly still and no one would came after me. Even if I was the last person standing, they would refuse to target me. Eventually, I would just say, “Oh, darn, I’m on,” and walk away.

You’re probably thinking, “Why not tell a teacher or leader?” I did. They told me to stop lying. Or they told me “no one likes a tattletale.” One time they said I needed professional help to cure my “imagination.” The adults would say, “They would never do that. They’re good people.” Even if it was done right in front of them, they would still side with the bullies over me.

Recently, Jazza did a video showcasing another YouTuber called Haddy the Creator. In it, Haddy drew Pokèmon as monsters. Thanks to Jazza’s video, Haddy’s channel went from about 500 subscribers to 7,000 like overnight. The problem is how many will actually stay? I have 1.3k followers on Twitter, but I rarely get anything over a like. Sometimes I get some retweets. It doesn’t feel good when you have a large number of subs or followers and yet no one answers your polls or comments or watches your videos.

A few years ago, at church, people started being nice to me out of nowhere. They started inviting me to sit with them or join their group. I thought, “Finally! I must have broken through the imaginary wall!” It felt good to be appreciated and welcomed. But, then I found out that there was some kind of project going around. People were assigned to focus those the council decided weren’t active enough. At first, I thought this might be coincidence. That changed when the month ended and new assignments were giving. Immediately, they all went back to ignoring me and treating me like I had a disease.

So, I hope the people who followed Haddy actually like his stuff and did not subscribe just because some “famous” person suggested it. I have to agree with NoahElowyn’s post about telling someone their cover (writing, drawing, song, etc) is good when it really isn’t. You can be supportive and say it has potential, but also let them know what isn’t good about it so that they can improve. You shouldn’t say like my art teacher back in third grade that it sucks and I can do anything right. You give the person constructive criticism. “I liked X, but Y could be better, but I also liked Z.” For every negative thing, you need to tell two positives. Not telling someone the bad stuff hurts them more than helps. The person thinks they’re doing great when they really aren’t and then they get upset because they have 1.3k followers but no one looks at their stuff!!

I was planning on doing a drawing of the video game character Kirby becoming a monster and then showing it off while saying I got the inspiration for it from Haddy the Creator. I wanted to share his video. His monster Pokèmon was well detailed and ugly but his normal Pokèmon were a little rushed. But, that doesn’t mean I don’t think his art is bad. If he continues and gets support, it’ll just get better.

So, I wanted to share what I thought was a good drawing, but I feel like what is the point. No one seems to look at my Instagram account. Now and then I get some likes but it just feels like they’re doing it just to be like “oh, it’s good” but it really isn’t. No one comments. I take the time to comment when I can on their stuff. What’s the problem?

And that brings up another issue. Everyone sure loved having me around when it benefited them, but I ask for help and they take off. I got a phone call one day from a church leader. They said they missed me at church. I was like, “Wow, really? Thanks.” Maybe they do care. He then said, “Yeah, we need you for our statistics.” Needless to say, I didn’t feel like going to church the next few weeks. They freak out when one of the “chosen ones” miss an hour but I miss six months and they can’t even say, “hi.”

It’s been stressful lately.

Nameless by Dean Koontz | Review

The Nameless series by Dean Koontz follows a character without a name. He, Nameless, has no memory of his life before two years ago. But, the twist is he doesn’t care that he has amnesia. He believes his amnesia to be of his own choice. Instead, he spends his time righting wrongs. He helps those that the criminal system, for whatever reason, failed them. He is not completely alone in the endeavor; a team called Ace of Diamonds supports him on his missions.

The series was differently different. Nameless doesn’t focus on figuring out who he is like characters normally do in amnesia stories. Nameless doesn’t question Ace of Diamonds like you normally see/read in these types of stories. From the beginning, he has accepted his life.

The series isn’t really a mystery series. The bad guys are known right away. Nameless doesn’t investigate; or if he does, it is very little. Before the book begins, the perpetrator is already declared guilty. Koontz leaves no question that the villain is quite evil.

The series isn’t really a thriller either. Ace of Diamonds seems to know pretty much everything. There aren’t too many incidents were Nameless is caught off guard. In fact, most of the time the perpetrator never even sees him. There isn’t some long gun battle between the two or a high-adrenaline kung-fu battle. The books almost read like a police report or some military after action report. You never fear for Nameless’ safety; Ace of Diamonds is nearly always in control.

The strange thing is that it kind of works. Maybe it’s because it is a fresh take on storytelling. Or maybe it’s that there are a few moments of suspense. It was odd. I enjoyed the first book; I didn’t find it boring or “too safe.” It wasn’t until the end that I realized how in control the protagonist was. It should have been boring. I should have been asking, “Where’s the conflict?” I guess this shows how masterful Koontz is in writing; he can make a mission report engaging.

I give the series a 4.9/5 because there is just something that nags at you. It isn’t perfect, but you can’t figure out what it is. The writing was excellent; and even though there seemed to be no conflict or rising action, I was not bored. I enjoyed this fresh idea. Maybe it comes down to personal taste. There were times that the descriptions were too vivid, like when the villains would feel themselves over.

Follow and turn on notifications to get more reviews, musings, and whatever else I can think of.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.

K-Pop | Throwback Thursday

Lately, I’ve been watching a lot of Young Yong Tales on YouTube; and boy, does he like K-Pop. This, however, reminded me of a book plot from when I was much younger.

I decided to come up with a plot where the villains used a futuristic drug to attack the city. This drug was highly addictive–just a small dose of it would make you addicted enough to kill for it or die from withdrawal. The drug came in the form of a soda drink called Killer Pop or K-Pop for short. At the time, I thought everyone called carbonated flavor drinks “pop.” I eventually found out that most people call them “soda.” I was told calling it pop might confuse people. Soon after I learned/figured out that popular music is also called pop.

I then came up with a new idea. We already have drugs that are injected/ingested; so if the drug was really futuristic it needed to be different. I decided that the drug would be delivered through sound. Only a few bars of the music would hook the victim. I also figured this would be a frightening drug because instead of having to leave the house and meet up with a drug dealer on the streets, the person could just download it off the Internet (it was just sound after all). It was also scary because an assassin could just hack into your playlist and add the song. The next time you went jogging…boom, you’re hooked. I still stuck with the K-Pop name because I was too lazy to figure something else out; plus it could stand for Killer Pop, as in killer music.

So imagine my surprise when a few months or a year (or two) later K-Pop was mentioned in the news. I was like “whaaaaaat?!” At first, I thought someone had actually come up with the drug…and then I learned it just meant Korean Pop music. Whew.

Though after watching those Young Yong videos and listening to how much he likes K-Pop…nah. Couldn’t be real. Or could it? Maybe that’s how all these boy/girl bands become so famous! Duh-duh-duuuuh…LOL.

I’m joking of course. Though I haven’t listened to any K-Pop, I highly doubt that it is an addictive drug created by super villains in order to control the minds of the masses. Fortnite on the other hand…

Hmm, in the Killer Pop sequel, I did come up with a version of it that would infect a person just by looking at it.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


Join in the adventure as Joe and company deal with everything from waking up in the morning to stopping an alien invasion in the Christmas themed eBook Gift of the Minion. Releases Dec. 3. Preorder for $0.99, regular price $2.99.

Plot Hole Fix

At first when I watched the Game Theorists video on why electric/lightning Pokèmon aren’t that great, I was like, “Oh interesting.” Also, finally someone explained volts, amps, and ohms in a way that wasn’t completely confusing. But then as expected, at two in the morning my brain was like, “Oh my gosh! Air resistance!!”

In the video, it explains how air has a high ohm factor, which means that it is a very good insulator against electricity. Like they said in the video, “It’s why we don’t get electrocuted every time the wind blows.” There needs to be a lot a build up before a lightning strike. This mattered to me because I could use it in my science fiction books.

My main character has the power of telekinesis. From this I get people saying, “Why does he need to get in close to fight his opponent? Why not just toss him from afar or drop a car on him?” I explained part of this as a battle of wills. A person generally does not like to be thrown against a wall, so the foe’s will is fighting against the protagonist’s will to throw him, which drains the hero of energy. But now, I can add in air resistance/insulation. The further away the protagonist is from the opponent, the more resistance there is for his “psychic” energy. So to conserve his energy, he needs to fight hand-to-hand.

Now, I can respond with something other than, “it’s fiction; give it a rest.”

And they say you can’t learn anything from video games.

Do you have a strange story of inspiration? Let me know in the comments below.

Until next wormhole…thanks for reading.


Join in the adventure as Joe and company deal with everything from waking up in the morning to stopping an alien invasion in the Christmas themed eBook Gift of the Minion. Releases Dec. 3. Preorder for $0.99, regular price $2.99.

Recommended #34

The following are my opinion and do not reflect the opinion of any organization or person.

Watch Me Draw A Comic Strip! “Smarter” – Part 2 by John Vogel

The Missing Girl by Gita V. Reddy

Power Down by BJK White

The Phoenix Conspiracy by Richard Sanders

Lightning Rider by Rick Mofina

The Last VidCon Recap by Let Me Explain Studios

How To Defend A Village! – Minecraft 1.14 Let’s Play by SystemZee

Do you have any recommendations? Tell me in the comments.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


The Beast of Camp TimberWolf is now available for preorder. It releases Oct. 22, 2019. If you’re a fan of action, adventure, an science fiction-fantasy, buy the latest Dogboy Chronicles story now.

Salesman | Dogboy Reborn Side Quests

The villainous Glue laughed wildly within his hidden lair. “Ah-hahahah!! That fool Dogboy has taken the bait!” Glue twisted and squeezed his hands in excitement. “Soon he’ll be in my clutches. Now, what deathtrap should I use?”

Glue gazed over his wide collection of deadly machines. There was the giant mousetrap. There was the classic tank of sharks. “Maybe the Spinning Blades of Doom!” said Glue.

Bzzzzt!…Bzzztt!

“Oh, now what?” huffed the villain.

Glue stormed through his lair as the doorbell continued to buzz. Glue grumbled, “I’m coming. I’m coming.” He passed by gold statues of himself and walked under the 15 foot portraits of himself. He kidnapped the famous artist, Art with Sam, in order to commission them.

Glue flung the door open. “WHAT?!”

“Good evening, malicious sir,” said the man wearing a tweed overcoat and brimmed hat, which he tipped in greeting. “My name is Salesman. I am a lair-to-lair salesperson for the Omega Institute. Would you be interested in–”

“NO!”

SLAM!!

Glue followed his door slam with a door lock. He grumbled some more then turned. “GAH!” he yelped with a jump that made it look like he’d just seen a spider in his shower.

Salesman tipped his hat again.

“How’d you get in?” asked Glue.

The man held up a small black circle. “With the handy-dandy Portable Hole. You just stick this little beaut on any surface and voilà instant hole.” The man sat down his sale’s bag. With a click of the lock, he opened it and began riffling through it. “I’ve got boxing gloves on springs, acid spraying squirt flowers, gasses of all varieties; and of course, the ever popular freeze ray,” the man said, pulling the items out one by one.

Glue folded his arms. “Not interested.”

Salesman would not be deterred–his commission rested on getting a sale. “For the more modernist villain: I have swords that can slice an atom. I have bombs with misleading timers. I’ve got drones, spy cameras, and backdoor codes to various government databases.”

Glue let out an annoyed and warning sigh. Salesman either ignored him or didn’t hear him. Instead, he put a hand on Glue’s shoulder. “But, I can tell you are a…” He surveyed Glue’s black and orange containment suit. He could hear the sloshing of glue within. Without the suit, Glue would be a large glob of dried glue. “…uh, man of tradition. I’ve got cartoon bombs and sticks of dynamite…two for one.”

Glue groaned.

“How about some exploding pies?”

“What flavor?”

“Coconut creme.”

“Ew-yuck! I hate coconut creme. How about an ejector trap made to look like floor tiles?”

Salesman lifted his hat enough to scratch his head. He glanced down at his sale’s bag. “Gee, I don’t think so.”

Glue grunted a quick, dry laugh. “I do.” He tapped a button on his wrist computer panel.

SPOING!!

The spring loaded ejection title under Salesman launched him into the air and out through the hole in the roof–Glue had opened the roof; he didn’t want to clean up the mess.

“You’ll regret thiiiiiisss…” said the trailing voice of Salesman.

Glue closed the roof hatch then clasped his hands together. “Now…where was I?”


If you’d like more adventures starring Dogboy, check out the Joe Rover eBooks–available at many online retailers.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading!


Copyright © 2019 Joe Rover

Dogboy and related characters Copyright © 2016-Present by Joe Rover

All rights reserved. No part of this post may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without prior written permission of the author/publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in reviews or as a repost/share with link to the original post.

All characters, organizations, and locations in this post have no existence outside the imagination of the author and have no relation to anyone bearing the same name or names. Any resemblance to individuals known or unknown to the author are purely coincidental.

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