Infinity Train Episodes 9-10 (Spoilers and Theories)

Here’s the complete playlist: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5

Infinity Train is a (as of now) mini-series airing on Cartoon Network from Aug. 5-9. For now, it is ten 11 minute episodes. Each night two episodes will air. The show is also available on the Cartoon Network app.

The event is over, but with the promise of “Infinity Train will return.” These last two episodes answered all of the important questions. I won’t go into them here because I don’t want to spoil it and I think you should watch it yourself. But, I will say the ending was amazing. I’ll also say that I’m glad it is revealed that the person vaporized by the light in the first episode wasn’t killed.

I do want to talk about the questions left unanswered. We find out who the Conductor is and why they are against Tulip while the train is for her. We also found out how the cars and cockroach things are created. We also get a hint at what the numbers mean. What isn’t answered is where the train came from and its purpose.

Lastly, we don’t know why the land the train travels through is barren and full of those creatures. I guess the shows hints at it a bit. Tulip is shown a picture of the train’s engine. She sees that it has cannons, which can be repurposed to make the cockroaches. The cannons can alter reality, such as changing Atticus into a cockroach or changing a computer into a corgi. So, it is possible the Conductor used the front cannons to shape the land it travels through.

But, what I mostly liked about the show is that the big questions were answered. It felt complete. I didn’t feel like, “Great, now I have to wait till the next season.” I was left feeling like the story was done, but at the same time excited for the next one.

I would highly recommend this show to those who like puzzles, mysteries, and fantasy. It comes with action, suspense, emotion, and humor. The animation is also great. The acting was well done. I continually felt like I was watching a high-budget movie. Also, it felt like the world was completely flushed out. 4.8/5

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


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Infinity Train Episodes 7-8 (Spoilers and Theories)

Here’s the complete playlist: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5

Infinity Train is a (as of now) mini-series airing on Cartoon Network from Aug. 5-9. For now, it is ten 11 minute episodes. Each night two episodes will air. The show is also available on the Cartoon Network app.

We’re getting close to the end now.

I didn’t like the “Chrome Car” episode as much as the others. It was your typical main character encounters their mirror self episode. I did like that the Infinity Train creators didn’t just have Mirror Tulip be evil. The mirror version was more like how Tulip wished she was. Mirror Tulip feels trapped and wants to explore the world. When Tulip says she can help, the mirror version says something like, “You’re trapped too. You hide out in your room all the time and never see the world.”

Episode 8, “Ball Pit Car,” had more to it however. It was nice to see Tulip having fun instead of being serious and logical. And just right when everything is happy, the wire monster arrives and the action kicks off. But, what I really liked about the episode is you finally learn who the wire creature is and you finally meet the Conductor. The Conductor does confirm that he/it is after Tulip for leaving her car and messing with his plans. You also get to see how the soul-sucking cockroaches from episode one are created.

In other words, a lot of questions get answered in this episode. But then more questions arise, like what is the Conductor’s plan? Also, it seems that the train wants Tulip to explore but the Conductor does not. It sounds like the Conductor is either malfunctioning or he’s gotten too big for his metal breeches and wants to “rule the train.” The Conductor seems to want the train to be more orderly and logical–kind of like how Tulip wanted it to be at first.

What do you think is the Conductor’s master plan? How is Tulip going to cope with the events of the “Ball Pit Car?” Let me know your thoughts in the comments.

Until next wormhole…thanks for reading!


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Infinity Train Episodes 3-4 (Spoilers and Theories)

Here’s the complete playlist: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5

Infinity Train is a (as of now) mini-series airing on Cartoon Network from Aug. 5-9. For now, it is ten 11 minute episodes. Each night two episodes will air. The show is also available on the Cartoon Network app.

The third episode started out a little confusing. In the previous episode, Tulip is scared by the number on her hand dropping; she believes it means she’ll die. In the third episode, she is actively trying to cause the number to change. It made me feel like there was a missing episode.

The number, however, does not change. Tulip rushes through each car telling everyone she has no time to stop. Finally, she enters the Corgi Car where she is forced to stop because a monster is blocking the exit. During her stay, she learns to slow down and be patient–the answers will eventually come. Once again, once she learns her lesson, the number changes. But, there is more to the episode.

The monster, at first, is a spider who’s shadow is distorted by a glowing orb. Soon they discover that a metal, robotic creature is taking the orbs from sections of the train car. It is shown that the sunny day scene of the car is just a hologram. Also everything in the car, from sunlight to the water, is controlled by the orbs. The “metal spider” seems to be repairing the train by taking out the orbs but doesn’t replace them. The creature is also seen to glitch. It seems obvious that the machine is broken or has a bug.

The creature then notices Tulip and screams, “Take your seat!” before retreating. Sounds like something a ticket taker, or a conductor, would say. Maybe the conductor is faulty and needs someone who likes to program–like Tulip–to fix it.

In the fourth episode, Tulip once again can’t force the “hand number” to change. She states that she has tried everything logical, but it doesn’t work. She is upset at how illogical the train seems to be. In the Crystal Car, she has to sing a song that matters to her before she can leave. It isn’t until she sings a song from her family road trips that she succeeds. The number then drops again.

It seems as if the train is teaching her to open her heart. It seems like she has walled off her feelings, because of her parents’ divorce, and built a barrier of science to block her emotions. I also found it interesting how the number drop seems to correlate to the “importance” or “success” of the lesson. When she yells at One-One, it goes down by one. When she sings the song, it drops by more.

I’m getting this sense that the train, and the world outside the train, is broken. Just like how Tulip probably feels about her family. It isn’t her love of science that frees her from the Crystal Car but her love of her family. The metal spider also seems to be broken. My theory is Tulip needs to fix it and heal herself from what is happening with her family.

I find it interesting that the creatures Tulip encounters seem to know they are on the train but have no interest in leaving it or their cars. None of the other “passengers” seem to have numbers on their hands or paws. Tulip seems to be the only human onboard. The only other passenger that seems to travel the cars is the cat, a con artist.

What are your theories? Is the metal spider the conductor? Why is Tulip the only one with a number? Are all the cars holograms/programs?

And what do you think of the show so far? Good, bad, meh?

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


If you’re interested in more reviews, theories, stories, and more, don’t forget to follow and turn on notifications. Or you can check out more of my posts in the archives.

Infinity Train Episodes 1-2 (Spoilers and Theories)

Here’s the complete playlist: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5

Infinity Train is a (as of now) mini-series airing on Cartoon Network from Aug. 5-9. For now, it is ten 11 minute episodes. Each night two episodes will air. The show is also available on the Cartoon Network app.

In the first two episodes, Tulip is on her way to coding camp. She is already working on a video game similar to Space Invaders. Unfortunately, her divorced parents are unable to take her at the last minute. She decides to make her own way there. Soon, she discovers a train. Upon entering, she is transported to a seemingly endless train where each car contains its own–and sometimes bizarre–universe. She needs to make her way to the Conductor in order to leave.

The first episode gives us a few theories to work with. Tulip meets a round robot that can divide itself called One-One. One side is depressive while the other is more upbeat. Both are pretty naive. One-One is looking for its “mother,” which it doesn’t know who she is or what she looks like. Since Tulip is a coder and interested in video games, it is possible that she is One-One’s “mother.” She could either create the robot as a video game character or as an actual robot.

The next big theory that I have comes from what happens after Tulip tries to escape the train. Outside the cars is a desolate wasteland. She soon runs into a cockroach-like creature that can age people/suck out their souls. It would seem like Tulip has been transported to the future, but I think the train cars are actual other worlds–either imaginary or real–with the train as some sort of hub or container. I am thinking that the train is more symbolic like the place is a dreamworld or the mind. The soul-sucking roaches might be things that cause us to give up on our dreams; they kill us on the inside.

More evidence to my dreamland theory shows up in the second episode. On Tulip’s hand is a glowing number. In the first episode it is 115, but it changes to 114 in the second. The thing is it doesn’t change during her “fails” through the other cars. She has trouble in the crossword, evil plant, and pinball worlds, but the number stays the same. It only changes after she yells at One-One for causing her trouble.

If One-One is her creation and she yells at it, and later tries to sell him/it in order for a way off the train, her dropping a “health point” could mean she’d been tempted to give up on her dreams. She states that all she wanted was to get off the train; she is willing to give up on going to camp (i.e. give up on her dreams) in order to escape.

When Tulip asks One-One what happens if the number reaches zero, One-One says she’ll be gone. He doesn’t say she’ll die–Tulip assumes she’ll die. There are other ways “to be gone,” such as giving up on your dreams or just simply getting kicked off the train. In the first episode, we do see someone getting vaporized by a strange light, but we don’t know if the person was killed or just transported away.

For now, my theory is that the Infinity Train is some kind of dreamland filled with imagination (possibly other worlds). People are brought there to come up with ideas, fight for their ideas, or learn some lesson–this part I haven’t completely figured out. It does seem the main point of Tulip’s story is her fight for her dreams. It is almost like she is deciding something–maybe does she continue running away or does she return to her family.

What’s your theory? Let me know in the comments.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


If you’re interested in more reviews, theories, stories, and more, don’t forget to follow and turn on notifications. Or you can check out more of my posts in the archives.

Final Adventure | Adventure Time Review

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Cartoon Network on Sept. 3, 2018, aired the final episode of Adventure Time(titled “The Ultimate Adventure: Come Along With Me) and I have to say it lived up to the hype. A while ago, I stopped watching Adventure Time as it grew even weirder than its normal weird, but I had to come back for the final episode. (Man, eight years and ten seasons on Cartoon Network…wow.)

I was glad to see that the final episode had its normal strangeness. It had the same beat and tone that made it so interesting in the first place. I enjoyed how you could not be entirely sure that what was shown in the episode is what really happened because it is told by BMO, who at first calls Finn “Phil.” But Adventure Time was always kind of like that; you didn’t know if what was going on was really what was going on. img_2674

Just like in the other episodes I’ve seen, the main story ended and you think that it is over but then suddenly something else, something more dangerous, happens. The finale continued the high-action and humor that’s been in many of the episodes. And I enjoyed how it wrapped up most of the story. It felt complete. But I also enjoyed how it ended with a hint of a new beginning–not in a spin-off kind of way but in a “the adventure never ends” sort of way. The ending seemed to be saying, “Yes, the series is ending but that doesn’t mean that the characters are gone.”

I also enjoyed how I could watch this episode and still understand what was going on. Like I said: I haven’t seen any episodes in a while, but I didn’t feel lost by all the Easter Eggs or references. The way the episode was presented it could be watched by a die hard fan or a moderate fan. I don’t think someone who never saw an Adventure Time episode would understand what was happening, but people who have seen some, even if it was a small some, could pick it up.

I have to say I am sad to see it go. The episodes I watched were enjoyable and so was the finale. I enjoyed the ending and felt sad that it was ending, but was also happy to see the series get a proper send off. I’d have to give it a 4.9/5 because I’m sure there were issues from animation or storytelling or there might be some continuity issues that hardcore fans noticed, but I genuinely enjoyed the feeling of the episode, and I felt like that mattered more at this point.

So long Finn and Jake and the rest of Adventure Time crew.

Now I’ve got to go binge-watch the episodes I missed.

Joe Rover eBooks are available at most online retailers.

Mega Review

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I recently started watching Mega Man: Fully Charged thanks to Cartoon Network’s on-demand service. I’ve been impatiently waiting for the release. I’m a big fan of Mega Man. It was the first action video game I played–up till then it was Mario Bros. And I enjoyed all the comics and TV shows of the Blue Bomber (who can resist name gags like Rock and his sister Roll).

But, after watching the first few minutes of the first episode, I could see how old fans could be turned off by it. First, Rock is now Aki and his sister is now a human named Suna. Second, the Mega-Mini that “lives” inside Aki’s head was kind of disturbing and off-putting at first. Then there was the fact that for awhile they kept putting “Mega” in front of everything.

However, as the episode continued, I found the series to be quite interesting. img_2674They hint at some previous dark and troubling war, and it was nice to see someone other than Wily be the main villain. I also enjoyed how Mega Man has to stay in range when he’s copying robot powers. In the first episode (second part), he also copies a piece of Fire Man’s personality and has to learn to control his anger in order to finish the fight. It was also interesting how the robots weren’t reprogrammed by Wily (at this point–they might change this at some point); the robots were choosing to attack; it added a bit more personality to the characters.

I also enjoy the short episodes. It makes it great to watch during breaks or just before bed or work. And the moments when the characters switch to 8-bit game characters for flashbacks or moments of extreme emotion add a nice twist to an anime-like formula.

For now, I find the show to be enjoyable and hope it continues. That opinion might change as the series continues; but now, I find it fun and funny–4.5/5.

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