Avengers: Endgame | Review (Spoilers)

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Over the weekend I saw Avengers: Endgame. I had a hard time figuring out what I thought about it. There was discontent between my writer brain and my fanboy brain.

As a movie, Endgame was pretty good. The action scenes were well done. There was a nice balance between humor and emotional scenes.

I did have a problem with how Old Man Cap was able to arrive in present day Marvel Cinematic Universe. According to the movie, if you remove (or add) something to the timeline, a new parallel timeline is created. If Captain America stayed in the past, it should have created an alternate present and he’d just stayed in that timeline. Some might say that he used the “time GPS” to return but then he should have appeared on the platform.

It also disturbed me that all the returned people were now five years behind everyone else. Ant-Man ended up missing five years of his daughter’s life.

img_2674Then there was the ending. As a writer, the ending was OK. I knew from how Marvel set up the world’s rules and the characters that someone had to die. But, as a fan, I wanted Iron Man to live and just retire with Pepper and his daughter. I know. This ending is more realistic. The hero had to sacrifice to return everyone. Etc.

Also, I felt like it ended with more questions than answers. For example, what about Loki stealing the tesseract. Sure, the tesseract from 1970 was return thus resetting the timeline but Loki still stole it after the New York invasion. The Avengers never returned that tesseract. And if Old Man Steve managed to rejoin the MCU timeline, does that mean tesseract Loki will eventually catch up too? Thor joined the Guardians of the Galaxy–does that mean Loki will show up as the villain in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3?

The reason I became interested in superheroes is because they offer hope. Life has its problems–illness, injury, loss of a job, and so on. In the superhero world, there is the villain that causes problems. The hero does suffer and sacrifice but eventually wins. They show that no matter how bleak things get eventually it gets better.

Life is sad enough without it being thrown back at us at the movies. Sometimes you want to go to the movies to escape. You want the good guys to win and there be a happy ending.

It also felt like the crew had changed the movie to please the “trends and trolls.” When the MCU started, the movies were more lighthearted, but then people kept saying, “None of the characters die,” and “Time travel? Ugh, lame.” It seemed like things were different in Endgame–even Captain Marvel and the new Spider-Man movie seem to lean more towards how the movies were at first.

But then I realized that I was troll-feeding in my writing. I was changing the story to try to get more views or reads. I kept trying to fit the story to the wants of others instead of telling the story I wanted. I mean, you do need to compromise some–like changing something because your readers are confused, but the problem comes when you change the core of the work. If you start changing what made your work special in the first place, it starts to fall apart.

I also realized part of this discontent was a fear that the following movies would follow suit. I was worried that the rest would be all gloomy. I also realized that part of the problem was that I’m getting superhero fatigue. On my way home, I noticed that Captain Marvel was still playing at the theater. There were two superhero movies from Marvel at the theater. Take a breather now and then, Marvel.

I also suffered real fatigue. The movie was just too long. It needed to be about 30 minutes sorter…maybe 15.

Finally, I remembered that Endgame was like a series finale. It was the moment to say “good-bye” to all the characters you’ve gotten to know over the last 10 years. It was supposed to be sad. Also, Endgame was the culmination of 10 years of build-up, it needed to live up to the hype.

So, there were a few problems, like plot inconsistencies and an ending I didn’t enjoy, but as a movie…it was pretty good–I really enjoyed it up until the ending. The acting was well done as were the effects. You cheered when certain moments happened and you cried at other moments. I also enjoyed how the movie did what movies should do–make you think and make you feel. After the movie, I kept trying to figure out why I felt “out of sorts” about it.

I have to give the Avengers: Endgame a 4/5 and a 3/5. It was good from a movie perspective, but not so much from just my personal preferences–I’d much rather Tony live and retire and have the time skip to have only been a couple months to a year.

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Sparks of Rebellion has been released!

Joe Rover eBooks are available at many online retailers, such as Barnes and Noble, Apple Books, Walmart eBooks, and more.

Say My Name | SHAZAM! Review

Reviews are my opinion. Spoiler alert.

Holy Moly! The SHAZAM! movie is finally out, and it was awesome.

I do have to agree with other reviews that the beginning was kind of slow and awkward. If you know the origins of Shazam, the opening can be a little long; but if you don’t, you might see it as more interesting. But once Billy get’s on the subway train…heh, heh, the fun begins.

They did a really good job balancing the movie. It wasn’t too dark/serious and not too comical/silly. You had some serious, emotional moments–and some intense moments–layered with some humor.

The Shazam costume looked a lot like it does it in the comics. It almost looked like it was taken right off the page. I mean, there were some differences but not enough to really matter. I liked how they went with the bright red instead of trying to make it a dark red or muted red.

The acting was well done. The actors seemed to get along; they seemed to know their character and how they would react. Nothing seemed forced or unnatural. Zachary Levi did an excellent job of pretending to be a 14-year-old in an adult’s body. Sometimes when they have those “age shift” movies, the actor acts too silly and comes off as acting younger than the age they are supposed to be. For instance, they are supposed to be a 14-year-old but the adult actor acts more like a 6-year-old.

Rating GuideI did have a problem with how when Billy was Billy he was serious and kind of mopey; but when he was Shazam, he was a little more immature and kid-like. It seemed like an awkward unexplained shift. I can kind of give it a pass because he is hanging out with Freddy. When you’re hanging out with friends, especially when you’ve been on your own like Billy had been, you let loose. Plus, as Shazam, he was a powerful adult thus probably feeling more like he could let down his defenses.

All the Easter Eggs also made the movie enjoyable, like the nod to the movie Big at the toy store or the Mr. Mind reveal. Also John Glover, who played Lex Luthor’s father on Smallville, plays Sivana’s father. In the Shazam! movie, Sivana’s father is a wealthy jerk…just like Lex’s father. Sivana is a bald genius. Lex is also a bald genius.

Finally, I liked that Freddy and Billy never came up with a superhero name. They go through hundreds of names but never settle on one. It was a nice nod to the comics where Billy’s hero name is a little unclear. Is it Captain Marvel? Is it Shazam? Is it just Billy?

I had a hard time finding things wrong with it. I’d really like to see it again and use more critical thinking. I don’t think it was a perfect movie, but it was pretty close. If DC can continue this balance of serious and humor–don’t have the movies be kiddy-goofy but also don’t make them apocalyptic-gloomy either, I think their movie future will be bright. 4.98/5

Other SHAZAM! related videos–contains spoilers.

Shazam! End Credits Scene Explained (SPOILERS!) by IGN

Shazam!’s Big DC Superhero Cameo Revealed by IGN


Sparks of Rebellion is available for preorder. It releases April 19, 2019.

Joe Rover eBooks are available at many online retailers, such as Barnes and Noble, Apple Books, Walmart eBooks, and more.