Invincible Quill Magazine (Nov. issue) | Rapid Review

The following are my opinion and do not reflect the opinion of any organization or person. May contain spoilers!

Invincible Quill Magazine November 2019 issue (Earnest Writes, free download): The latest issue has launched, and it’s about National Novel Writing Month (aka NaNoWriMo). The latest issue focuses on helping writers through NaNoWriMo. There are poems, prompts, and articles. I did notice some typos and some awkward sentences, but what work of art doesn’t have flubs? I liked the “Writing Styles Alignments” chart that lets you know if you were a neutral pantser or a chaotic plotter. According to the sheet, I’m a chaotic plantser; this means that I have a plot idea and then it all goes crazy from there. I also enjoyed the article by Kairavi Pandya titled “Better Egotist Than Poseur.” The article talks about how readers and writers alike think of novelists and poets as the brain surgeons of the field while they think of screenwriters or drama writers as loyal physicians. I like how the author mentions that a novelist is not better than someone who writes short stories–we’re all writers. Finally, this issue seemed to fly by. I got to one point and was like, “Why won’t this scroll any more?” It was because I was at the end of the magazine. The magazine was so interesting to read that it felt like I just started. The flow of poems to articles and back again made the reading captivating. I felt like I was reading something entertaining, not a boring textbook.

Do you have any shows, books, movies, etc you’d like to see a review on? Tell me in the comments.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


Join in the adventure as Joe and company deal with everything from waking up in the morning to stopping an alien invasion in the Christmas themed eBook Gift of the Minion. Releases Dec. 3. Preorder for $0.99, regular price $2.99.

Yolocraft, Fortnite, and More | Rapid Reviews (Spoilers)

The following are my opinion and do not reflect the opinion of any organization or person. May contain spoilers!

Yolocraft Season 8 (Blitzwinger & Unlimited Magic, YouTube): With another death the eighth season of Yolocraft comes to a close. *sob* It was an interesting one with unexplained deaths and disappearing horses. It was also odd to actually know more about the new Minecraft features than they did; usually it was them telling me. But, as always, the team of Blitzwinger and Unlimited Magic provided video after video of entertainment. There was humor and there was suspense. Each time they went into the Nether was nerve wrecking. And there were episodes I wished they would have edited; for instance, watching them ride their horses for about 30 minutes while they looked for the Pillager Outpost. Probably the best part of the series was the thousands of chickens they had.

Fortnite Chapter 2 Season 1 (Epic Games, PlayStation 4, Xbox, and more): Before you get too excited, I know that season 1 isn’t over–I also know that apparently it’s been extended to February–this is just a little recap/mid-review. The first chapter of Fortnite I didn’t play much. It was mostly the crossover events. First, I couldn’t afford any skins. Second, I’m bad at shooter games. Third, I felt like I didn’t get anywhere. It seemed like I never leveled up or progressed and on top of that I couldn’t make it passed the nineties. So, I am enjoying the new leveling system where it tells you in big letters, “Hey! You leveled up!” I also like how you can see your progress in the Battle Pass section. I don’t know how much of the menus they fixed, but it seems easier to find things like missions. I really enjoy the extra XP time during the weekends. When I first saw how far I’d have to go to get any of the Battle Pass skins, I thought, “That’s never going to happen,” then one day I was at level 60. I don’t know if they reworked their matchups but I seemed to actually survive for longer periods and actually get eliminations. Before, it was just me running away and dying…a lot. I’m also looking forward to this villain team/EGO thing they are hinting at.

Photographing the Dead by Dean Koontz (Nameless series, #2): I have to agree with some of the reviews I’ve seen that the second book wasn’t as good as the first, but that doesn’t make it bad. I still found it to be thrilling and hard to put it down. I liked how Koontz kept shifting to the two women hiking. You knew that they were going to meet the killer at some point, but would they survive? I kind of felt like I was always racing towards some unavoidable fate. Koontz’s villain was creepy as always; he really knows how to make a truly evil antagonist. You feel no pity for the man. I enjoy how Koontz tells the reader that sometimes the person is just evil–that they do something just because they can or they think they are better than everyone else. In the first book, I didn’t feel that there was much danger for Nameless–I kind of felt the same in this one–but I was worried for the hikers. Now that I think about it, maybe that’s the point: feel for the victims. After Nameless sees those “ghosts” at the end, I began to wonder if Nameless isn’t so “nice.” Maybe he murdered someone and we shouldn’t feel sympathy or worry about him.

Do you have any shows, books, movies, etc you’d like to see a review on? Tell me in the comments.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


Join in the adventure as Joe and company deal with everything from waking up in the morning to stopping an alien invasion in the Christmas themed eBook Gift of the Minion. Releases Dec. 3. Preorder for $0.99, regular price $2.99.

The Mandalorian and More |Rapid Reviews (Spoilers)

The following are my opinion and do not reflect the opinion of any organization or person. May contain spoilers!

Horace Crenshaw, Jr.: Author of Blowing Sandstorm which, as the website describes, is a memoir of “a commander that was put in charge of an Army Reserve Petroleum Unit during the initial months of Operation Iraqi Freedom.” I haven’t read the book yet, but I was impressed with the website. It looked very professional. It was easy to read; there were few to no errors; and everything was easy to access. Within moments of arriving, I knew who Crenshaw was, what services he offered, and what the book was about. I would suggest fixing the book trailer video to add a thumbnail, if possible. As it is of writing this post, it looks like a broken link and makes me hesitant to click it.

The Mandalorian (Disney +): I was a bit leery and skeptical about the show. I’m not that big a fan of bounty hunter/anti-hero type of shows (though they are growing on me). I was a bit worried in the opening scenes when The Mandalorian didn’t speak. I was concerned about what type of show this would be. I was glad to see that events picked up. It was a little slow at first, but first episodes usually are. I was glad to see the action pick up; and then when I saw who The Mandalorian’s target was, I was hooked. Then it got better in the second episode. It added some humor and we got to see more of The Mandalorian’s character. Finally, I like the lone-hero western feel of the show; you can feel the isolation of the character and the environment.

New Super Lucky’s Tale (Nintendo Switch–Playful Corp.): It’s hard not to like a game with a cute fox who wears a cape. The graphics and animations are bright and cheerful, perfect for kids and the young at heart. The game comes with a ton (and I mean a ton) of puns. The characters are also very unique and colorful. I liked the burrowing mechanic; it allows you to avoid dangers by passing under them or you can use it to sneak up on foes. Also, it’s nice to see a game where a tail whip attack actually does something–I’m looking at you Pokèmon (LOL). Finally, it didn’t seem like you needed to be a master gamer in order to collect all the items. I didn’t play the game but watched the gameplay series by Stampy Cat (aka stampylonghead)–the videos are sponsored by Playful Corp.

Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order (PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Microsoft Windows–Respawn Entertainment): I haven’t played the game, but I saw the cutscenes and some of the gameplay thanks to Gamer’s Little Playground. The story was very intriguing and hooked me right away. It was great to see what surviving Jedi were doing since the Purge. I quickly became attached to Cal and the other characters. I did notice times where the game got glitchy, such as characters passing through objects. Also, at times it looked like the characters would change appearance slightly. I don’t know if it was just the gameplay or something with the game, but at times the animations–especially during some of the fights–would seem odd. But, I like the ending and I hope this means we see more of Cal and the Mantis crew.

Lady and the Tramp (2019 live-action, Disney +): I think I liked the animated version a tiny bit better, but this version was also great. I liked how the animal characters showed emotion. They looked like they were sad or happy; they didn’t look stiff. I enjoyed how believable the CGI was; I could believe that these were “talking” animals. I also liked how it followed the original but wasn’t a carbon copy. It did start to feel long near the end.

Do you have any shows, books, movies, etc you’d like to see a review on? Tell me in the comments.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


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K-Pop | Throwback Thursday

Lately, I’ve been watching a lot of Young Yong Tales on YouTube; and boy, does he like K-Pop. This, however, reminded me of a book plot from when I was much younger.

I decided to come up with a plot where the villains used a futuristic drug to attack the city. This drug was highly addictive–just a small dose of it would make you addicted enough to kill for it or die from withdrawal. The drug came in the form of a soda drink called Killer Pop or K-Pop for short. At the time, I thought everyone called carbonated flavor drinks “pop.” I eventually found out that most people call them “soda.” I was told calling it pop might confuse people. Soon after I learned/figured out that popular music is also called pop.

I then came up with a new idea. We already have drugs that are injected/ingested; so if the drug was really futuristic it needed to be different. I decided that the drug would be delivered through sound. Only a few bars of the music would hook the victim. I also figured this would be a frightening drug because instead of having to leave the house and meet up with a drug dealer on the streets, the person could just download it off the Internet (it was just sound after all). It was also scary because an assassin could just hack into your playlist and add the song. The next time you went jogging…boom, you’re hooked. I still stuck with the K-Pop name because I was too lazy to figure something else out; plus it could stand for Killer Pop, as in killer music.

So imagine my surprise when a few months or a year (or two) later K-Pop was mentioned in the news. I was like “whaaaaaat?!” At first, I thought someone had actually come up with the drug…and then I learned it just meant Korean Pop music. Whew.

Though after watching those Young Yong videos and listening to how much he likes K-Pop…nah. Couldn’t be real. Or could it? Maybe that’s how all these boy/girl bands become so famous! Duh-duh-duuuuh…LOL.

I’m joking of course. Though I haven’t listened to any K-Pop, I highly doubt that it is an addictive drug created by super villains in order to control the minds of the masses. Fortnite on the other hand…

Hmm, in the Killer Pop sequel, I did come up with a version of it that would infect a person just by looking at it.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


Join in the adventure as Joe and company deal with everything from waking up in the morning to stopping an alien invasion in the Christmas themed eBook Gift of the Minion. Releases Dec. 3. Preorder for $0.99, regular price $2.99.

Plot Hole Fix

At first when I watched the Game Theorists video on why electric/lightning Pokèmon aren’t that great, I was like, “Oh interesting.” Also, finally someone explained volts, amps, and ohms in a way that wasn’t completely confusing. But then as expected, at two in the morning my brain was like, “Oh my gosh! Air resistance!!”

In the video, it explains how air has a high ohm factor, which means that it is a very good insulator against electricity. Like they said in the video, “It’s why we don’t get electrocuted every time the wind blows.” There needs to be a lot a build up before a lightning strike. This mattered to me because I could use it in my science fiction books.

My main character has the power of telekinesis. From this I get people saying, “Why does he need to get in close to fight his opponent? Why not just toss him from afar or drop a car on him?” I explained part of this as a battle of wills. A person generally does not like to be thrown against a wall, so the foe’s will is fighting against the protagonist’s will to throw him, which drains the hero of energy. But now, I can add in air resistance/insulation. The further away the protagonist is from the opponent, the more resistance there is for his “psychic” energy. So to conserve his energy, he needs to fight hand-to-hand.

Now, I can respond with something other than, “it’s fiction; give it a rest.”

And they say you can’t learn anything from video games.

Do you have a strange story of inspiration? Let me know in the comments below.

Until next wormhole…thanks for reading.


Join in the adventure as Joe and company deal with everything from waking up in the morning to stopping an alien invasion in the Christmas themed eBook Gift of the Minion. Releases Dec. 3. Preorder for $0.99, regular price $2.99.

The Writer’s Everything 001 | Review

Along with his YouTube channel and fictional works, QJ Martin released the first issue of the The Writer’s Everything, a magazine geared to helping writers with…everything. The first issue can be found on his Patreon page. You do need a Patreon account to read it.

First, I liked the magazine’s brevity. The articles were short and to the point. There was also a little bit of humor mixed in with the professional tone. I did notice a few editing errors, such as missing words. But, for the most part, it is well polished.

The design was also amazing. I liked the sidebars which provided definitions and explanations. Also, the definitions were not full of jargon–professional or amateur writers could understand what was being said. The lines, as well as the columns, were clean and professional. The color scheme and fonts were eye-catching without being distracting.

On the subject of sidebars, one with short recommendations on pens or software would be nice. It could be as simple as the product’s title. I’d like to know what design software was used to make the magazine.

As for the articles, I found them friendly and easy to understand. I felt like I was receiving advice/information from a friend and not some “know-it-all” who wanted to show off their big words. I felt like Martin understood the subject and knew his audience.

In all, the magazine was informative while being short enough that I didn’t feel like a little kid going, “Are we there yet?” 4.8/5

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


“The fresh snow nestled the Earth like a warm blanket during a thunderstorm. Specks of frozen water clung to the hibernating trees making them shimmer…”

Looking for your next sci-fi/fantasy read? Try The Beast of Camp TimberWolf; now available at many online retailers.

Love | Review

‪ ‬The poem “Love” by William Lynn recounts the story of someone who falls for another.

I enjoyed the line when the narrator asks if the person was an angel or a demon sent by the Devil to torment them. It showed the narrator’s feelings well and added the question of why they can’t be together; it makes you want to read more. My problem was that the question didn’t seem to be answered; I still want to know why they can’t be together.

The poem keeps the same tone very well. I can picture someone sitting at a desk thinking or even just sitting on a park bench watching their love interest from afar. You feel like you can get inside the narrator’s state of mind. I did notice a couple times when it felt like the rhythm faltered or became awkward; but for the most part, the poem flowed well.

I also had some trouble with getting lost in the lines. This is easily resolved by adding some verse/paragraph breaks now and then.

Another line I enjoyed was when the narrator mentions how people told them they didn’t know what love was. It gives the reader an idea of how old the narrator is. I could picture an older teen or young adult. The idea of a younger narrator is reinforced by the word choice. The flow and structure also makes it sound like a younger person speaking. I did not feel like I was brought out of the poem until the end.

While the poem was not perfect, it was well done and a great read. I enjoyed that I did not have to spend hours trying to pick it apart to understand it. Lynn does an excellent job of telling the reader what is happening while still giving you something to think about. 4.4/5

You can follow William Lynn on their blog or on Twitter.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


Fans of fantasy and sci-fi, The Beast of Camp TimberWolf is out now. You can purchase it from many online retailers.