Invincible Quill Magazine (Nov. issue) | Rapid Review

The following are my opinion and do not reflect the opinion of any organization or person. May contain spoilers!

Invincible Quill Magazine November 2019 issue (Earnest Writes, free download): The latest issue has launched, and it’s about National Novel Writing Month (aka NaNoWriMo). The latest issue focuses on helping writers through NaNoWriMo. There are poems, prompts, and articles. I did notice some typos and some awkward sentences, but what work of art doesn’t have flubs? I liked the “Writing Styles Alignments” chart that lets you know if you were a neutral pantser or a chaotic plotter. According to the sheet, I’m a chaotic plantser; this means that I have a plot idea and then it all goes crazy from there. I also enjoyed the article by Kairavi Pandya titled “Better Egotist Than Poseur.” The article talks about how readers and writers alike think of novelists and poets as the brain surgeons of the field while they think of screenwriters or drama writers as loyal physicians. I like how the author mentions that a novelist is not better than someone who writes short stories–we’re all writers. Finally, this issue seemed to fly by. I got to one point and was like, “Why won’t this scroll any more?” It was because I was at the end of the magazine. The magazine was so interesting to read that it felt like I just started. The flow of poems to articles and back again made the reading captivating. I felt like I was reading something entertaining, not a boring textbook.

Do you have any shows, books, movies, etc you’d like to see a review on? Tell me in the comments.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


Join in the adventure as Joe and company deal with everything from waking up in the morning to stopping an alien invasion in the Christmas themed eBook Gift of the Minion. Releases Dec. 3. Preorder for $0.99, regular price $2.99.

The Writer’s Everything 001 | Review

Along with his YouTube channel and fictional works, QJ Martin released the first issue of the The Writer’s Everything, a magazine geared to helping writers with…everything. The first issue can be found on his Patreon page. You do need a Patreon account to read it.

First, I liked the magazine’s brevity. The articles were short and to the point. There was also a little bit of humor mixed in with the professional tone. I did notice a few editing errors, such as missing words. But, for the most part, it is well polished.

The design was also amazing. I liked the sidebars which provided definitions and explanations. Also, the definitions were not full of jargon–professional or amateur writers could understand what was being said. The lines, as well as the columns, were clean and professional. The color scheme and fonts were eye-catching without being distracting.

On the subject of sidebars, one with short recommendations on pens or software would be nice. It could be as simple as the product’s title. I’d like to know what design software was used to make the magazine.

As for the articles, I found them friendly and easy to understand. I felt like I was receiving advice/information from a friend and not some “know-it-all” who wanted to show off their big words. I felt like Martin understood the subject and knew his audience.

In all, the magazine was informative while being short enough that I didn’t feel like a little kid going, “Are we there yet?” 4.8/5

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


“The fresh snow nestled the Earth like a warm blanket during a thunderstorm. Specks of frozen water clung to the hibernating trees making them shimmer…”

Looking for your next sci-fi/fantasy read? Try The Beast of Camp TimberWolf; now available at many online retailers.

Inspiration #3

The following is a collection of story ideas I either don’t have time for or have lost interest in. Feel free to use them for your own stories, but please mention something akin to “based on an idea by Joe Rover, joerover.com.” Feel free to mix and modify the ideas.

More and more police officers are being ambushed during what should be standard investigations. Traffic stops, domestic disturbances, noise complaints are no longer relatively safe. Detective Peters wants to know why. Is it just bad luck or is someone trying to remove the police before something much bigger happens?

A reporter covering a story about the decline in bee numbers finds themselves abducted. But he/she is not abducted by people but by bees. For some reason bees are abducting people and forcing them to gather honey. Why would the bees need help collecting honey? Rival insects? Disease? Mankind tampering with nature?

A popular eSports player wins the title of National Champ but is soon accused of cheating. He/she must prove their innocence in Video Game Court. His/her lawyer must gather evidence by solving real-life puzzle games, complete interviews by choosing the right questions from a list of available options, and chase down informants through platforming obstacle courses. Can the lawyer reach the goal or is it game over?

It’s summer vacation and Terry (or Terri) is out cliff diving with friends. It’s his/her turn. They dive perfectly but upon hitting the water, they come across a strange world where whatever they dream/imagine comes true. What does Terry/Terri create? Do they leave or stay? What is this world they’ve found? Is it real or are they actually in a coma or dream?

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


The Beast of Camp TimberWolf is now available for preorder. It releases Oct. 22, 2019. If you’re a fan of action, adventure, an science fiction-fantasy, buy the latest Dogboy Chronicles story now.

Weekend Read | Review

Over the last few days, I’ve been looking over the app Weekend Read by Quote-Unquote Apps.

The app let’s you read various screenplays, and not just independent, hardly heard of screenplays but from movies like Big Fish, The Boxtrolls, Wizard of Oz, and more. Along with the ones provided, you can add your own through links or Dropbox.

The interface was fairly easy to use–not perfect but not difficult. With the app, you can also switch between a “modern” version of the screenplay and a version of the one submitted to studios.

I wasn’t too found with only being able to store four files in the library–unless I wanted to pay more, but you can delete screenplays you’ve already read.

The app’s look isn’t flashy; it is pretty standard for a file reader. But the simple look makes it easy to locate what you want. The simple look also makes the app inviting. I didn’t feel like this was something only a big-time screenwriter could understand. The app isn’t filled with confusing jargon; it is designed for everyone in mind.

Compared to other apps, it isn’t the most exciting, but it is a fairly inexpensive tool if you are looking into writing your own screenplay and want examples. It is also good for, just as the name states, a weekend read. 3.9/5

For more reviews and geeky antics, consider following.

Until the next wormhole…thanks for reading.


If you liked this content, please consider supporting me on Ko-fi at ko-fi.com/joerover.

Joe Rover eBooks are available at many online retailers, such as Barnes and Noble, Apple Books, Walmart eBooks, and more.

FNAF Doomed? | Tips and Tricks

Recently, I watched the “FNAF IS DOOMED! The Real Truth of Five Nights at Freddy’s” video by Treesicle. I think they might have a point.

If you talk to others within the FNAF or YouTube Gaming “bubble” (as Treesicle called it), they would tell you Five Nights at Freddy’s is an important and game-changing game. But if you talk to people outside that bubble, they tend to look at you weird. “What is FNAF?” they say, “Is that some kind of new disease?”

If you mention Sonic the Hedgehog or Mario, most people would understand who you’re talking about. They probably wouldn’t have a great amount of details about them, but they would at least know they were video game characters.

And the Treesicle crew is right about the YouTube bubble. I’m always hearing about hundreds or thousands of people who buy the merch of people like TheOdd1sOut or It’s Alex Clark, but I never see anyone wearing the merch IRL. About the only time I see anything about YouTube Creators outside of YouTube itself is if they wrote a book.

The video continues to mention why some franchises stay around for decades while others don’t. The video starts out with character development and world building. I have to agree there isn’t much world building to FNAF. If asked by someone what FNAF is, I’d say, “You play as a security guard who’s trying to survive not being killed by pizzeria animatronics.” There isn’t much to say about who the characters are, what they want, the world at large, or anything else.

The Treesicle people continue to talk about FNAF being a mystery. They mention how people love a mystery; but eventually, they want it solved. It’s fun trying to solve a mystery yourself. (Why do you think game theory, or just theory in general, YouTube channels are so popular?) The problem is after a while the audience would like to know if they are right. FNAF has been going on since 2014 with little to no information about “the truth.” By now, people want to know why the animatronics are after security guards, how did they come to life, and so on. There’s a lot of theories on YouTube but not a lot of answers.

Next, they talk about the fact FNAF is a horror game. They show statistics that horror is not that popular of a genre. It makes sense. The first time you see a horror movie or experience a horror game, you’re nervous and jumpy. The first time that ax murderer jumps out from behind the rosebush, you scream, jump, and gasp. The second time, you might jump a little because you forgot about the scare; but by the tenth time, you aren’t reacting at all. It’s hard to be spooked when you know exactly when the surprise is coming.

Another nail in the FNAF coffin is the game’s randomness. There doesn’t seem to be any skill involved. In the Mario games, you can gain platforming skills. You can learn timing on jumps; you can learn strategy (like choosing to toss that turtle shell at the right moment in order to cause a chain reaction). But, in FNAF a lot of it comes down to luck. Is Freddy going to come for you? Is Freddy even going to move that night?

For example, in a Mario level there might be a red warp pipe that takes you to a coin room. If you replay the level, the red warp pipe will still take you to the coin room. You could play the level 80 times and the red warp pipe will take you to the coin room. If it was a random game, one time the red warp pipe takes you to the coin room, but the next time the warp pipe doesn’t work; the next time, it might take you to a lava room.

Finally, the Treesicle team talks about the games and shows that do stick around. Most of them are adventure based. Again, this makes sense. Look at Captain America. What is his goal? Battle evil. There is always going to be some new evil to fight. What is the goal of Ash in Pokémon? Catch ’em all, to become the very best like no one ever was, and make friends. Can he ever do it? Can he really “catch them all”? Can he ever be “the best”? And you can always make new friends. The goals of the franchises that stick around are general enough that the characters never reach their goal, but specific enough that the audience feels like the character is making headway. Captain America will never defeat evil, but he can defeat the Red Skull. Now, look at FNAF. What is the goal? Survive five nights. You did that…now what? It makes for a great standalone game but not a series.

So, my word of advice to any game maker or author or screenwriter is if you want to make a series with staying power, you need a developed world with characters who’s goals are just vague enough that the character will never accomplish them but defined enough that it seems like they are accomplishing them. If you do have a mystery series, you need to solve the mystery relatively quickly (probably within a couple episodes/issues at most) then move on to the next mystery. Look at the mystery book classics, the mystery was solved by the end of the novel. Look at mystery TV shows, the case is usually solved by the end of the episode; they don’t leave it unsolved for five years.


Joe Rover eBooks are available at many online retailers, such as Barnes and Noble, Apple Books, Walmart eBooks, and more.

The first interactive story game based on my book series can be found here.